Published Credits

Joel Seath | Writer
Hampshire, England
 
Once upon a teller fell (fiction)
being a novel of literary fiction
CreateSpace (December 2016)
Available via: www.joelseath.wordpress.com

The architectures of childhood: children, modern architecture and reconstruction in postwar England
being a book review of the above title by roy kozlovsky
International Journal of Play [online]; print issue tba (July 2014)
this is an accepted manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in International Journal of Play on 01/07/2014, available online: www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/21594937.2014.930568

Four kinds of wreckage (savage short loves: volume II) (fiction)
being a collection of literary micro-fiction
KDP ebook (December 2013)
Available via: www.joelseath.wordpress.com

Four kinds of wreckage (savage short loves: volume I) (fiction)
being a collection of literary micro-fiction
KDP ebook (February 2013)
Available via: www.joelseath.wordpress.com

Disintegration and other stories (fiction)
being a collection of literary fiction
Preface by Sonam C. Gyamtsho and Ian Rochford
KDP ebook (November 2012) / print (January 2013)
Available via: www.joelseath.wordpress.com

Play and time and the art of sitting around
being an account regarding a gathering of playworkers
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 141 (March 2013)
First published at Playworkings as Play and time and the art of sitting around

A school, modified play, and the danger of leaves
being an interview conducted with a school learning support assistant
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 125 (November 2012)
First published at Playworkings as A school, modified play, and the danger of leaves

Children’s play is not about you
being an article on how adult-led agendas threaten children’s play
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 124 (October 2012)
First published at Playworkings as Children’s play is not about you

Playworkers as epiguardians of the genome
being an abridged version of a presentation on the study of epigenetics as related to children
(reproduced for the Beauty of Play Report 2012: The Essence of Play)
Ludemos: The Home of Therapeutic Playwork [online] 2012 Report (September 2012)
Available from: www.ludemos.co.uk
First published at Playworkings as Epigenetics and play

Play in an uncertain field
being a perspective on government policy towards play and its affect on playworkers’ creativity of thought
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 73 (November 2011)
Available from: www.ip-dip.org.uk

A therapeutic play of poetry
being an account of adult play opportunities in delivery of poetry play support
(reproduced for the Beauty of Play Report 2011: The Dark Side of Play)
Ludemos: The Home of Therapeutic Playwork [online] 2011 Report (October 2011)
Available from: www.ludemos.co.uk

A disturbing experience (for anyone, even more so for a playworker)
being an account regarding the irrational culture of fear, and how some parents might exacerbate this by playing their own fears through their children
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 53 (June 2011)
Available from: www.ip-dip.org.uk

Children and touch
being observations concerning the child’s psychological relationship with the playworker via physical contact, following an article by Michael Gove MP on appropriate touch relationships of music teachers with pupils
iP-Dip Weekly [online] Issue 33 (January 2011)
Available from: www.ip-dip.org.uk

Reflection on reflection
being a reflection on use of a reflective analysis and evalution model as applied to playwork practice
iP-Dip Magazine [print] Issue 20 (June 2010)
Back issues available via: www.ip-dip.org.uk

Outside play: the playwork perspective (with Polly Blaikie)
being an article highlighting biophilia and the psychological benefits of play in the wider world
Horizon Magazine [print] Issue 16 (Autumn 2008)
Back issues available via Hampshire EECU: www3.hants.gov.uk

Back in the day
being a reflection on a return to childhood haunts
iP-Dip Magazine [print] Issue 2 (January-March 2008)
Back issues available via: www.ip-dip.org.uk
 
 

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